Knit Without Ceasing

Sock-in-Progress

Eye of jupiterI'm working on a sock with this yarn, Sereknity's Eye of Jupiter.

(Yes, I am having a Battlestar Galactica geekfest, with a side order of Firefly, what's it to ya?)

Anyway, I've got a problem. I'm making this sock with the Yarn Harlot's basic sock pattern from "Knitting Rules," across 64 stitches on size 2 needles, and the "leg" part is huge and baggy, but the heel fits perfectly and it looks like the foot will be okay, too (I've just gotten back to 64 stitches).

What have I done wrong? Maybe I've made too many socks using Monkey, a pattern with a charming lace pattern that makes the sock leg stretchy and clingy. I can't believe going down to size 1 needles is the answer, though I'm willing to consider the possibility. Or is it just that I'm not used to having a non-chunky ankle? (Because happily, I have a non-chunky ankle these days.)

Knitters, I seek your wisdom.

Is this a problem blocking can cure? Or must I frog this thing?

Knitting 001

It bags in the back.

And I guess it bags in the front/on the side, too.

Knitting 004

 

17 thoughts on “Sock-in-Progress”

  1. I have less information on this knitting business than I do on snow. Sorry.
    But I really like the yarn. And the fact that you can even make a sock-shaped object out of it is pretty impressive.

    Like

  2. Can I just tell you how RELIEVED I am that “sock-in-progress” means you are MAKING a sock and NOT waiting for a sock to make its way through your dog? ‘Cause that was my FIRST thought — around here, “WHERE are your socks?!” is a common refrain when we see a sockless kid — because otherwise, socks are in Amanda where they stay for about three weeks and then we usually get to revisit them. SO glad your question has to do with yarn and knitting! 😉

    Like

  3. How long have you knit the leg? Have you measured your ankles? You may need to taper the sock a bit for a tighter fit.
    An alternative to all that Math: if you like the way the heel and foot are fitting, you can frog the leg (I know! I know!) and reknit it with ribbing over the same stitch count.

    Like

  4. Is Kathryn hoping Jesus will show up and fix your sock? 🙂 Or does she think you are…nevermind.
    I love this and have absolutely no suggestions-so sorry-but I’m tickled red, orange, blue and green about the non-chunky ankle. Go you!

    Like

  5. I believe she is giving the all-purpose children’s sermon answer; some kids think “Jesus” is the answer to *everything!*

    Like

  6. Assuming your swatch matched the gauge, could this pattern be from when the Yarn Harlot was on crutches and her ankle was swollen? Let’s go with the whole “Songbird has non-chunky ankles” angle.
    Size 2 needles? I’m working with 11s right now. Yeesh, I thought the 8s I was using last week were thin! (I need the immediate gratification you just can’t get from tiny stitches.)

    Like

  7. Gorgeous sock! I don’t think blocking will help and I know how frustrating it will be to frog it:(
    I made a pair of Cat Bordhi socks which I love, except that the foot is too baggy – everything is fine, so I have to start those over too. I’ve abandoned them to work on another project. I think if you do frog the socks, try knitting the leg on a smaller needle (not that you can go much smaller!) Or you could try decreasing the leg a few rows above the heel. . . .???

    Like

  8. HAHAHAHA, thanks for the translation of KZJ. **My** standard answer to anything I don’t know how to answer is, “hit it with a hammer!”
    Note that I never (rarely) suggest that for people, more for THINGS that are not working. Hitting the sock with a hammer would not likely work, but it might make *you* feel better.

    Like

  9. I hate to break it to you, but to get it to fit, you will need to frog (is it top down). Somewhere you need to either decrease before you get to the ankle.
    maybe felt them?

    Like

Leave a Reply to Mary Beth Cancel reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.